Edward Lasker vs. George Alan Thomas

Edward Lasker vs. sir George Alan Thomas, London, 1912. White to move and win in 7! In the real confrontation the mate comes after the 8th, spectacular, move.

Roll over to see the solution: 1. Qxh7+ Kxh7 2. Nxf6+ Kh6 3. Neg4+ Kg5 4. f4+ Kh4 5. g3+ Kh3 6. Bf1+ Bg2 7. Nf2# or 1. Qxh7+ Kxh7 2. Nxf6+ Kh6 3. Neg4+ Kg5 4. h4+ Kf4 5. g3+ Kf3 6. Be2+ Kg2 7. Rh2+ Kg1 8. O-O-O#

FEN: rn3rk1/pbppq1pp/1p2pb2/4N2Q/3PN3/3B4/PPP2PPP/R3K2R w KQ - 7 11

About the players

Edward LaskerEdward Lasker (1885-1981), engineer by profession, he was a German - American chess and Go player. He was distantly related with World Chess Champion Emanuel Lasker (1868-1941).


George AlanThomasSir George Alan Thomas (1881-1972), 7th baronet. British badminton, tennis and chess player. He won twice the British Chess Championship.


15 Responses

  1. Dwayne Burnett
    Dwayne Burnett at

    I solved this puzzle in 7 moves : Qh5xh7+ Kg8xh7
    2. Ne4xf6+ Kh7-h6
    3. Ne5-g4+ Kh6-g5
    4. f2-f4+ Kg5-h4
    5. g2-g3+ Kh4-h3
    6. Bd3-f1+ Bb7-g2
    7. Ng4-f2#

    Reply
  2. JSR Vermeulen
    JSR Vermeulen at

    slecht vertalen doet het hierzo,,,nog eens een gemiste kans,,,dus nu weet ik het ECHT ZEKER,,,,,IK KOOP HET DUS NIET!!!!!!!!!!

    afz;jsr vermeulen uit Denhaag.

    Reply
  3. Obrien
    Obrien at

    I found two move win, Qf7 KingH8 Ng6

    Reply
  4. Gaurav kadam
    Gaurav kadam at

    1. Qxh7+ Kxh7
    2. Nxf6+ Kh6
    3. Neg4+ Kg5
    4. h4+ Kf4
    5. g3+ Kf3
    6. Be4

    Reply
  5. ...
    ... at

    i have a rather… idiotic solution

    1. Ne5-g6 h7xg6
    2. Qh5xg6 Bf6xd4
    3. c2-c3 Bd4-c5
    4. f2-f3 Bc5-e3
    5. h2-h4 Nb8-c6
    6. Ne4-g5 Be3xg5
    7. h4xg5 Rf8-f5
    8. g2-g4 Rf5-e5+
    9. Ke1-f2 Qe7-c5+
    10. Kf2-g3 Re5xg5
    11. Rh1-h8+ Kg8xh8
    12. Qg6-h7#

    Reply
  6. Paumil Shah
    Paumil Shah at

    1. Qxh7+ Kxh7
    2. Nxf6+ Kh6
    3. Neg4+ Kg5
    4. f4+ Kh4
    5. g3+ Kh3
    6. Be2+Kg2
    7. Rh2+ Kg1
    8. O-O-O#

    Reply
  7. Celso Sandrejo Jr
    Celso Sandrejo Jr at

    1. Qxh7+ – Kxh7
    2. Nxf6++ – Kh6
    3. Ng4+. – Kg5
    4. h4+. – Kf4
    5. f3#

    Reply
  8. DIGVIJAY NEGI
    DIGVIJAY NEGI at

    GREAT COMBINATION

    Reply
  9. Jonh Scotto
    Jonh Scotto at

    1. Wf2-f4—Bf6-f4+
    2. g2-g3—Qe7-b4+
    3. Ke1-e2—d7-d6
    4. Ne4-g5—Bd7-f3+
    5. Ke2xf3—Kg8-h8
    7. Ng5-f7#

    Reply
  10. Jonh Scotto
    Jonh Scotto at

    1. White f2-f4—Blackf6-h4+ The Right One …
    2. g2-g3—Qe7-b4+
    3. Ke1-e2—d7-d6
    4. Ne4-g5—Bd7-f3+
    5. Ke2xf3—Rf8-c8
    6. Bd3xh7+—Kg8-h8
    7. Ng5-f7#

    Reply
  11. Tom H
    Tom H at

    Because of the number of moves, this puzzle is generally thought of and categorized as ‘difficult.’ Actually, it was easy… just look for the moves that give the opponent only one option.

    Reply
  12. Mohammed Alsayed
    Mohammed Alsayed at

    I don’t see anyone discussing ne4 to f6. It’s a win in maximum of 3 moves

    There are 4 scenarios:
    1. Ne4 to f6 .. (qf6 or pf6 or kh8)
    2. Qh7 mate

    The 4th scenario is black rf6
    2. Qh7 .. kg8
    3. Qh8 mate

    Please correct me if I’m wrong

    Reply
  13. Mohammed Alsayed
    Mohammed Alsayed at

    Sorry kf8 not g8 in the last scenario

    Reply
  14. Mohammed Alsayed
    Mohammed Alsayed at

    Yeah i see it now sorry
    In scenario pf6 q takes q disadvantage for white

    Reply
  15. Parigyan Chakraborty
    Parigyan Chakraborty at

    1.Qxh7 Kxh7 2.Nxf6 Kh6 (2…Kh8 3.Ng6 #)3.Neg4 Kg5 4.f4 Kh4 (4…Kxf4 5.g3 Kg5 6.h4#)5.g3 Kh3 6.Bf1 Bg2 7.Nf2#

    Reply
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