Learn Chess

Memoir by Former UT Dallas Chess Coach Rade Milovanovic

Memoir by Former UT Dallas Chess Coach Rade Milovanovic

TheBookPatch, a print-on-demand self-publisher, published Rade Milovanovic’s International Chess Master My Family and Chess Story with Selected Games and Pictures. The book is 246 pages. Milovanovic completed it in September of 2021. It retails for $38.00 for a print book. It is also available as an e-book ($10.00). More 🡢

Awonder Liang

Chess Move Order Mystery

In the ninth round of the 2022 U.S. Chess Championship, Grandmaster Awonder Liang played a surprising third move against Grandmaster Fabiano Caruana. Liang’s third move has long been considered bad, yet Liang drew the game. At the end of 13 rounds, Caruana became the 2022 U.S. Champion. More 🡢

Understanding pawn endgames

Understanding Pawn Endgames (book review)

In 2022, Gambit Publications published Understanding Pawn Endgames by International Master Valentin Bogdanov. Bogdanov is from Ukraine and was the 2016 European Over-65 Champion. More 🡢

Problem Chess The Art and Magic on the Chessboard

Problem Chess: Art and Magic on the Chess Board (book review)

Gambit Publications published Problem Chess: Art and Magic on the Chess Board by Göran Forslund. Forslund died in September 2015, just before the publication of this print edition. Previously, this Gambit title was available only in an electronic format. More 🡢

Modern chess opening repertoire for white

Modern Chess Opening Repertoire for White

Gambit Publications published Modern Chess Opening Repertoire for White by International Master James Rizzitano. More 🡢

Alexey Root receives trophy from Director Tom Crane

Chess Research: Monetary Awards for University Students

The Chessable Research Awards promote chess research by undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty research sponsors. Chessable plans three cycles per year of monetary awards. Applications for the first cycle are open until October 1, 2022. Chessable is also known for spaced repetition, which is a helpful technique for memorizing chess openings. More 🡢

Is it hard to learn chess?

Learning the rules of chess can be accomplished in one day. There are six different chessmen. Master how each moves and captures, and use them to checkmate your opponents, to succeed in your chess games.

Where can I learn chess?

The best way to learn is by playing! Right here on SparkChess you can play against different computer personas (start with Cody if you never played before). The game will highlight all valid moves for a piece, so it's easy to understand and learn the rules. Then you can move to learning strategies and openings with SparkChess Premium, which features an Opening Explorer with over 100 opening variations, 30 interactive lessons and even an AI coach.

What is the best way to start learning chess?

While learning chess online is efficient, since software corrects illegal moves, playing chess with others in person can be satisfying. You and a friend or family member could tackle chess together, perhaps reading the rules in a book. Playing on a three-dimensional chess set can be a fun break from our online lives. When in-person chess is not available, SparkChess has online multiplayer for playing with friends (and making new ones).

How can I teach myself to play chess?

While learning chess rules takes one day, becoming good at chess takes longer. One proverb states, “Chess is a sea in which a gnat may drink and an elephant may bathe.” With intense efforts, chess greatness can be achieved.