Viswanathan Anand vs. Magnus Carlsen at World Chess Championship 2013

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Round 9 – November 20 – Carlsen wins

A really great game this time – very agressive on both sides, but Carlsen is simply superior and wins beautifully.

[pgn_compat]
1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. f3 d5 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. bxc3 c5 7. cxd5 exd5

(7… Nxd5 {is the most common choice.})

8. e3 c4 9. Ne2

(9. g3 Nc6 10. Nh3 Na5
11. Bg2 Nb3 12. Ra2 Qa5 13. Bd2 O-O 14. O-O Re8 15. Nf2 Bf5 16. Re1 Re7 17. e4
dxe4 18. fxe4 Bg6 19. Qf3 Rd8 20. h4 h5 21. Re2 {1-0 Biolek,R (2399)-Agdestein,
S (2555)/Prague CZE 2013/The Week in Chess 950 (54)})

9… Nc6 10. g4 O-O

{[pgndiagram]Looks very brave at first glance.}

(10… h6 {weak according to Kasparov.} 11.
Bg2 Na5 12. O-O Nb3 13. Ra2 O-O 14. Ng3 Bd7 15. Qe1 Re8 16. e4 dxe4 17. fxe4
Nxg4 18. Bf4 Qh4 19. h3 Nf6 20. e5 Rad8 21. Qf2 Nh5 22. Bxh6 Re7 23. Nf5 Qxf2+
24. Rfxf2 Re6 25. Be3 Bc6 26. Bf1 f6 27. Bxc4 Bd5 28. Be2 fxe5 29. Bxh5 exd4
30. Bg5 Rd7 31. Rae2 Be4 32. Nxd4 {1-0 Kasparov,G (2820)-Polgar,J (2670)/
Tilburg NED 1997})

(10… Na5 {was certainly an option.})

(10… h5)

11. Bg2 Na5 12. O-O Nb3 13. Ra2 b5 14. Ng3

(14. g5 Nd7 15. e4 Nb6 16. e5 Bf5 17. f4 Na4
18. Rf3 Bb1 19. Rc2 a5 20. Rh3 b4 21. Be3 Bxc2 22. Qxc2 g6 23. axb4 axb4 24.
cxb4 Nb6 25. f5 Qd7 26. Ng3 Ra1+ 27. Bf1 Nc8 28. Rh6 Ne7 29. Qg2 Nxf5 30. Qh3
Rfa8 31. Rxh7 Kf8 32. Ne2 Nxe3 33. Qxe3 Qg4+ 34. Ng3 R8a2 35. e6 Rxf1+ 36. Kxf1
Qd1+ 37. Qe1 Qf3+ {0-1 Gardner,R (2202)-Shabalov,A (2534)/Calgary CAN 2012/The
Week in Chess 916})

14… a5 15. g5

(15. e4 {was a definite option.} dxe4)

15… Ne8 16. e4 Nxc1

{[pgndiagram]If white is really much better in only a few moves then
this may be the culprit but otherwise the knight may end up just being out of
play.}

(16… Nc7 {could easily be the better move.}

17. Be3 (17. e5 $2 b4)
17… Ra6 18. e5 b4 19. f4 {is worth investigating.} f5 {Giri}) 17. Qxc1 Ra6
18. e5 Nc7 19. f4 b4 20. axb4 $6

{[pgndiagram]After the game this move got some criticism.
Anand almost certainly was motivated to play this to get rid of Ra6 as a
defensive piece.}

(20. f5 Nb5 {This is the move that everyone was afraid of at
the time but it doesn’t seem to work. White would have to trust to intuition
that his attack will break through at this point.} (20… b3) 21. axb4 axb4 22.
Rxa6 Bxa6 23. f6 g6 {Is a line given by ChessPro Ru and Mikhail Golubev. It’s
possible to calculate to here and feel this has a good chance of winning. Will
take a bit more work to prove it’s winning.} 24. Qf4 (24. e6 fxe6 25. Qe3 Bc8
26. cxb4 Qd6 {is ChessPro’s line with equality.}) 24… Qb6 25. Qh4 h5 26. Nxh5
bxc3 27. Kh1 Nxd4 28. Ng3 Ne6 29. Nf5 gxf5 30. Qh5 Qb7 31. Bh3 {is indeed
winning if I run Houdini long enough.})

(20. a4 {was recommended by several
strong players with the idea that it stops a lot of black’s counter-play but
that would require a lot of analysis.})

20… axb4 21. Rxa6 Nxa6 22. f5 b3

{[pgndiagram]Cold blooded in the extreme but it seems sufficient to hold. Carlsen was over
half an hour behind on the clock but then Anand had a huge think himself.}

(
22… bxc3)

23. Qf4 {After 45 minutes thought.}

(23. f6 g6 24. Qf4 Kh8 25. Qh4
{isn’t fast enough.})

(23. h4 {a very slow continuation of the attack which I
suggested during the game in commentary also looks playable.})

23… Nc7 24. f6 g6

(24… gxf6 25. Nh5 {Looks very dangerous according to Carlsen.} Ne8 $1 (
25… fxg5 26. Nf6+ Kh8 27. Qxg5 Rg8))

25. Qh4 Ne8 $1 26. Qh6 b2 $1 27. Rf4
b1=Q+ 28. Nf1 $2

{[pgndiagram]A complete surprise. Anand moves quickly and it’s a losing
blunder.}

(28. Bf1 Qd1 29. Rh4 Qh5 30. Nxh5 gxh5 31. Rxh5 Bf5 32. g6 Bxg6 33.
Rg5 {is equal.})

28… Qe1 {[pgndiagram]And white has to resign.}

(28… Qd1 $2 {Was the
move Anand was expecting and it just loses.} 29. Rh4 Qh5 30. Rxh5 gxh5 31. Ne3
Be6 32. Bxd5 Bxd5 33. Nf5 Be4 34. Ne7+ Kh8 35. Qxf8#)
0-1
[/pgn_compat]