Learn Chess

Marvelous Modern Miniatures

April Fools’ Day: Chess Miniatures and GothamChess

On April Fools’ Day, it’s possible to trick oneself and others. Highlighted is Marvelous Modern Miniatures: 2020 Games in 20 Moves or Less and International Master Levy Rozman’s matches with International Master Greg Shahade and with the bird-feed seller Dadang Subur. More 🡢

Position from USATN

In Online Chess, Don’t Turn Draws into Losses

Turning a draw into a loss and only drawing when one’s team needed a win both happened in the two most recent U.S. Amateur Team Championships. Two heart-breaking chess positions are discussed in this article, though undoubtedly more than two sad games were played. More 🡢

Paul Whitehead

The Russian Endgame Handbook: Don’t Turn Chess Wins into Draws

In the endgame, it is easy to turn a win into a draw. If you don’t know the winning pattern, you may not stumble into it. When you play inaccurate moves, your win turns into a draw. If you do know the winning pattern, you will get the full point. This article has two examples from recent games, both of which were broadcast on Twitch. More 🡢

Exclusive: Free eBook from Forward Chess

We have an exclusive offer for our SparkChess players: a free interactive eBook from Forward Chess! There is a catch, though: the offer expires on March 20. More 🡢

Chess and weight loss

Chess Excuses and Weight Loss

Chess players make excuses for losing games and rating points. We lose chess games because we have not had dinner or because we have had dinner. We complain about the ratings formula. Likewise, we may make excuses for our extra pounds. More 🡢

Chess: U.S. Amateur Team West Round 1

Chess: U.S. Amateur Team West

The U.S. Amateur Team Championship—West (USATW) was first held in February of 1984, attracting 29 teams. This year, the USATW was hosted by the Mechanics’ Institute, the oldest chess club in the U.S. For the first time, the chess teams played online rather than in-person. Three more U.S. Amateur Team Championships are coming up online, on the last three weekends in February. More 🡢

Is it hard to learn chess?

Learning the rules of chess can be accomplished in one day. There are six different chessmen. Master how each moves and captures, and use them to checkmate your opponents, to succeed in your chess games.

Where can I learn chess?

The best way to learn is by playing! Right here on SparkChess you can play against different computer personas (start with Cody if you never played before). The game will highlight all valid moves for a piece, so it's easy to understand and learn the rules. Then you can move to learning strategies and openings with SparkChess Premium, which features an Opening Explorer with over 100 opening variations, 30 interactive lessons and even an AI coach.

What is the best way to start learning chess?

While learning chess online is efficient, since software corrects illegal moves, playing chess with others in person can be satisfying. You and a friend or family member could tackle chess together, perhaps reading the rules in a book. Playing on a three-dimensional chess set can be a fun break from our online lives. When in-person chess is not available, SparkChess has online multiplayer for playing with friends (and making new ones).

How can I teach myself to play chess?

While learning chess rules takes one day, becoming good at chess takes longer. One proverb states, “Chess is a sea in which a gnat may drink and an elephant may bathe.” With intense efforts, chess greatness can be achieved.