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UT Dallas chess team

Six Degrees of Separation and One Day More at the World Chess Championship

The recent World Chess Championship made me think of two iconic phrases. The first phrase is “six degrees of separation,” which states that a chain of “friend of a friend” statements can be made to connect any two people in six steps. In this article, I’ll share my two-step connections to the challenger, Fabiano Caruana, and to former World Chess Champion Bobby Fischer. The second phrase is “One Day More,” which is both a song lyric and a song title from the musical Les Misérables. More 🡢

World Chess Championship 2018: Fabiano Caruana vs Magnus Carlsen – Tiebreaks

World Chess Championship 2018: Fabiano Caruana vs Magnus Carlsen – Tiebreaks

After three Rapid games and with as many wins, Magnus Carlsen retains his title for another two years. More 🡢

Magnus Carlsen vs Fabiano Caruana

World Chess Championship 2018: Fabiano Caruana vs Magnus Carlsen – Game 12

Carlsen offers a draw from his superior position and Caruana accepts! This is quite disappointing. More 🡢

Magnus Carlsen vs Fabiano Caruana

World Chess Championship 2018: Magnus Carlsen vs Fabiano Caruana – Game 11

The shortest round of this Championship ends with another draw. More 🡢

“There’s a lot riding on the last game. It will be tense for both of us.” – Fabiano Caruana. More 🡢

Magnus Carlsen vs Fabiano Caruana

World Chess Championship 2018: Fabiano Caruana vs Magnus Carlsen – Game 10

“I felt that it was very close tonight. The problem is if I don’t mate I’m losing. So I was trying to find some middle ground and my time was running out. I don’t know. I was just so nervous, I couldn’t make it happen. It ended up just being nothing.” – Magnus Carlsen More 🡢

Magnus Carlsen vs Fabiano Caruana

World Chess Championship 2018: Fabiano Caruana vs Magnus Carlsen – Game 9

After the game, Magnus Carlsen declared that “I was very happy with the opening, obviously. You cannot expect more than what I had for sure.” With few rounds remaining, a tie-break becomes a distinct possibility, where Carslen is considered the favorite. Despite the anticlimactic draw, a new record was set: the longest streak of games ending in draw in a chess championship match! More 🡢

Is it hard to learn chess?

Learning the rules of chess can be accomplished in one day. There are six different chessmen. Master how each moves and captures, and use them to checkmate your opponents, to succeed in your chess games.

Where can I learn chess?

The best way to learn is by playing! Right here on SparkChess you can play against different computer personas (start with Cody if you never played before). The game will highlight all valid moves for a piece, so it's easy to understand and learn the rules. Then you can move to learning strategies and openings with SparkChess Premium, which features an Opening Explorer with over 100 opening variations, 30 interactive lessons and even an AI coach.

What is the best way to start learning chess?

While learning chess online is efficient, since software corrects illegal moves, playing chess with others in person can be satisfying. You and a friend or family member could tackle chess together, perhaps reading the rules in a book. Playing on a three-dimensional chess set can be a fun break from our online lives. When in-person chess is not available, SparkChess has online multiplayer for playing with friends (and making new ones).

How can I teach myself to play chess?

While learning chess rules takes one day, becoming good at chess takes longer. One proverb states, “Chess is a sea in which a gnat may drink and an elephant may bathe.” With intense efforts, chess greatness can be achieved.